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Lachnospira

Lachnospira is a genus of anaerobic bacteria that is a part of the human gut microbiota. Lachnospira is one of the best known members of the Lachnospiraceae family, a group of microbes with the unique ability to produce butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid crucial for maintaining gut health and integrity.1Vital M, Karch A, Pieper DH. Colonic Butyrate-Producing Communities in Humans: an Overview Using Omics Data. mSystems. 2017 Dec 5;2(6):e00130-17. doi: 10.1128/mSystems.00130-17.

Roles of Lachnospira species in human health:

  1. Digestive Health and SCFA Production: A principal role of Lachnospira in the human gut is the fermentation of dietary fibers, leading to the production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), such as butyrate, acetate, and propionate. These SCFAs are vital for maintaining colon health; they serve as an energy source for colonocytes, enhance mineral absorption, and help regulate fluid and electrolyte uptake in the colon. Butyrate, in particular, has been noted for its anti-inflammatory properties, which can help in preventing disorders like colorectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).2Louis, P., & Flint, H. J. (2014). Diversity, metabolism and microbial ecology of butyrate-producing bacteria from the human large intestine. FEMS Microbiology Letters, 334(1), 1-8. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1574-6968.2009.01514.x.
  2. Modulation of Immune Responses: SCFAs, including those produced by Lachnospira, have significant immunomodulatory effects. They help in regulating the balance between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory processes within the gut and beyond. Butyrate has been shown to influence the differentiation and proliferation of T cells and natural killer cells, supporting immune tolerance and systemic immune function.3Furusawa, Y., et al. (2013). Commensal microbe-derived butyrate induces the differentiation of colonic regulatory T cells. Nature, 504, 446-450. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature12721.
  3. Impact on Metabolic Health: The activities of Lachnospira have also been linked to broader metabolic effects, particularly in relation to obesity and metabolic syndrome. For instance, the modulation of SCFA levels can influence insulin sensitivity and lipid metabolism, factors integral to managing and preventing diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. A balanced gut microbiota, rich in SCFA-producing bacteria like Lachnospira, is associated with a healthier metabolic profile.4Clarke, S. F., et al. (2012). The role of gut microbiota in the gut-brain axis: current challenges and perspectives. Protein & Cell, 3(6), 403-414. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13238-012-2027-x.
  4. Influence on the Gut-Brain Axis: Emerging research suggests that gut microbiota, including Lachnospira, may play a role in the gut-brain axis, potentially affecting mental health outcomes. The mechanisms are believed to involve SCFAs and their systemic effects, which can impact neurological function and behavior.5Dinan, T. G., & Cryan, J. F. (2017). The microbiome-gut-brain axis in health and disease. Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, 46(1), 77-89. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gtc.2016.09.007.
  5. Supporting Allergic Responses and Respiratory Health: Studies have suggested that a decrease in Lachnospira could be associated with an increased risk of asthma and other allergic conditions in children. The presence of this genus might help to modulate immune responses in a way that protects against excessive inflammation associated with allergic reactions.6Arrieta, M. C., et al. (2015). Early infancy microbial and metabolic alterations affect risk of childhood asthma. Science Translational Medicine, 7(307), 307ra152. https://doi.org/10.1126/scitranslmed.aab2271.

Best sources of Lachnospira

Lachnospira is a genus of bacteria naturally residing in the human gastrointestinal tract. As such, it is not directly obtained from dietary sources. However, the growth and activity of Lachnospira can be significantly influenced by diet, specifically through the consumption of fiber-rich foods that support its proliferation and function.

The best way to promote the growth of Lachnospira in the gut is by consuming a diet high in complex carbohydrates and dietary fibers, particularly fermentable fibers. These fibers serve as prebiotics and include:

  • Whole Grains: Foods like barley, oats, and whole wheat provide resistant starches and non-digestible carbohydrates that ferment in the colon.
  • Vegetables: Particularly rich in inulin and other fermentable fibers are garlic, onions, leeks, asparagus, and artichokes.
  • Fruits: Apples, bananas, and berries contain pectin and other fiber types that help in maintaining a healthy gut flora.
  • Legumes: Beans, lentils, and peas are excellent sources of complex carbohydrates and fibers that are beneficial for gut bacteria.

These dietary choices help in maintaining a diverse and robust microbiome, fostering an environment where Lachnospira and other beneficial microbes can thrive. The production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) by these bacteria, through the fermentation of these fibers, is crucial for gut health, providing energy to gut cells, reducing inflammation, and helping in the absorption of essential minerals.7Flint, H. J., Scott, K. P., Louis, P., & Duncan, S. H. (2012). The role of the gut microbiota in nutrition and health. Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology, 9(10), 577-589. https://doi.org/10.1038/nrgastro.2012.156.8Scott, K. P., Gratz, S. W., Sheridan, P. O., Flint, H. J., & Duncan, S. H. (2013). The influence of diet on the gut microbiota. Pharmacological Research, 69(1), 52-60. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrs.2012.10.020,

Where to find Lachnospira in the Chuckling Goat Gut Microbiome Test

You will find your Lachnospira score in the “Butyrate” section of the “Postbiotics” report in your Chuckling Goat Gut Microbiome Test results.

Synonyms: Lachnospira does not have common synonyms. It is typically found alongside other genera within the Lachnospiraceae family, such as Blautia, Roseburia, and Coprococcus. These bacteria share similar functions in the gut, such as SCFA production, and they contribute to the overall health of the gastrointestinal system and beyond. Together, they help maintain a balanced microbial community, influencing everything from nutrient absorption to immune modulation.

Important disclaimer

The Chuckling Goat Gut Microbiome Handbook is an educational resource built to translate complex science into plain English. The information provided on this page is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your GP or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Always check with your GP for interactions.

References

  • 1
    Vital M, Karch A, Pieper DH. Colonic Butyrate-Producing Communities in Humans: an Overview Using Omics Data. mSystems. 2017 Dec 5;2(6):e00130-17. doi: 10.1128/mSystems.00130-17.
  • 2
    Louis, P., & Flint, H. J. (2014). Diversity, metabolism and microbial ecology of butyrate-producing bacteria from the human large intestine. FEMS Microbiology Letters, 334(1), 1-8. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1574-6968.2009.01514.x.
  • 3
    Furusawa, Y., et al. (2013). Commensal microbe-derived butyrate induces the differentiation of colonic regulatory T cells. Nature, 504, 446-450. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature12721.
  • 4
    Clarke, S. F., et al. (2012). The role of gut microbiota in the gut-brain axis: current challenges and perspectives. Protein & Cell, 3(6), 403-414. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13238-012-2027-x.
  • 5
    Dinan, T. G., & Cryan, J. F. (2017). The microbiome-gut-brain axis in health and disease. Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, 46(1), 77-89. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gtc.2016.09.007.
  • 6
    Arrieta, M. C., et al. (2015). Early infancy microbial and metabolic alterations affect risk of childhood asthma. Science Translational Medicine, 7(307), 307ra152. https://doi.org/10.1126/scitranslmed.aab2271.
  • 7
    Flint, H. J., Scott, K. P., Louis, P., & Duncan, S. H. (2012). The role of the gut microbiota in nutrition and health. Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology, 9(10), 577-589. https://doi.org/10.1038/nrgastro.2012.156.
  • 8
    Scott, K. P., Gratz, S. W., Sheridan, P. O., Flint, H. J., & Duncan, S. H. (2013). The influence of diet on the gut microbiota. Pharmacological Research, 69(1), 52-60. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrs.2012.10.020,

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